The Jacob lesson

I have been holding a lot of review meeting and this has come to mind.

The Bible clearly states: “Do not judge, or you too will be judged. For in the same way you judge others, you will be judged, and with the measure you use, it will be measured to you”.

God will often see to it that we are treated the same way we treat others.

Jacob was a talented young man with great ability, but he had a serious fault: As a young man, he would lie, connive, and scheme to get his own way, without a thought for other people’s feelings. He deceived his father Isaac into blessing him, instead of his brother Esau, with the birthright, and this split the family and caused much suffering, as Genesis 27 records.

God, of course, fully intended Jacob to have the birthright and could have worked it out in a way in which nobody got hurt. But this was not the first time that Jacob had used shrewdness to get his own way. Earlier, when Esau was about to collapse from lack of food, Jacob gave Esau bread, a stew of lentils, and a drink in exchange for his birthright. Jacob had a secret sin and needed to be taught a lesson. He could not look at himself and see that he had this sin. He probably looked at himself as many today in business look at themselves; he probably thought he was being clever and wise.

During the next few years, Jacob reaped what he had sowed. His employer and future father-in-law, Laban, tricked him out of his wages and the wife for whom he had laboured seven years. In addition, toward the end of his life, Jacob was also deceived by the use of a dead goat, just as he had deceived his father Isaac. Jacob’s sons dipped Joseph’s coat of many colours in the blood of a goat to convince their father that his favourite son, whom they had sold, was dead. Jacob spent many years in grief, deceived as he had deceived others.

So as we work together at work, let’s also take care not to behave like Jacob! What goes around comes around.

Hope your week is going well.

Mark

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