Jumping too quickly

Good afternoon and welcome to the new working week

The book of John chapter 8 verses 10-11 says “When Jesus had raised Himself up and saw no one but the woman, He said to her, “Woman, where are those accusers of yours? Has no one condemned you?” She said, “No one, Lord.” And Jesus said to her, “Neither do I condemn you; go and sin no more.”

Consider that this woman caught in adultery is indeed an obviously sinful woman; she had a reputation as a loose woman. The Pharisees had caught her in the very act of cheating on her husband, and that was probably only one of her many sins. We would likely not be wrong in calling her a wicked woman.

In every way opposite to her is Jesus Christ, sinless and perfect. The Pharisees, themselves sinful, attempt to force Him, a Man of unimpeachable character, to condemn a sinner—to them, a foregone conclusion: “And when they had set her in the midst, they said to Him, “Teacher, this woman was caught in adultery, in the very act. Now Moses, in the law, commanded us that such should be stoned. But what do You say?”. However, Jesus’ approach to the situation is poles apart; His reaction and attitude throughout is completely contrary to that of the Pharisees.

In their reading of the Old Testament law concerning the punishment for adultery, this was an open-and-shut case: The woman had been caught in the act, they had two or three witnesses, the law was clear, so there should be a stoning! What more proof does Jesus need?

Despite everything weighing against the woman, Jesus approaches the matter differently. He clearly understands that the woman had sinned. He realizes there were witnesses to that effect. He knows the law and the penalty, but He does not leap to a verdict of condemnation.

Recall that, for some time, He does nothing but write on the ground (John 8:6). He lets the matter simmer. While the Pharisees agitate for answers and demand action, Jesus patiently waits. God works with us in the same way. We can become infuriated when God fails to answer us immediately after we say, “Amen,” but giving us time for things to work out is a consistent pattern with Him. We can be certain that He does this when we are accused before Him, even when we are guilty as charged, as the remainder of the passage in John 8 shows.

Recently we saw in Daniel the same process of God waiting to answer, prayers made, silence from Heaven, prayers made, silence from Heaven, prayer meeting ends, silence from Heaven, then later ….. God answers.

So the lessons here are clear. Let’s not jump to condemnation when a work colleague ( or anyone else for that matter) in our view messes up. Let’s behave as Jesus did and second, let’s give God time , after all, His time in my experience is always perfect! I can demonstrate this over and over again.

Have a great week

Mark

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